Tag Archives: comics

Now On Sale – “In A Single Bound: Superheroes For Greater Boston…And Beyond!”

Covers-12-150-small(wow I can’t believe I totally forgot to post about this back in April) (yes I realize I’ve been neglecting this site) (I could have sworn I posted about this when it happened…)

I recently published another comic book story, this one with Boston Comics Roundtable / Ninth Art Press and featuring artwork by my friend Jim Gallagher. Our story is part of an anthology series about Boston-centric superheroes, and what’s even cooler is that our superhero “Louie the Lone Dervish” (inspired by Louie With The Tricycle, a popular homeless guy around these parts) is featured right there on the cover on the anthology as well. Not bad for a story about a crazy superhobo on a refurbished three-wheeler!

The comic was originally set to have its debut at Boston Comic-Con back in April, but, well, that kind of got postponed because, you know, all kinds of craziness. So it’s now available online following the re-scheduled Boston Comic-Con from last weekend. You can pick up a copy of “In A Single Bound” #2 over at the Ninth Art Press website, a scant $6 for 36 glorious black-and-white pages done entirely by Boston-based writers & artists.

UPDATE: this blog post managed to make the rounds today, thanks to the magical powers of the Internet, and I was interviewed by Boston Magazine about it. You know, ’cause I’m awesome n’shizz. Check out the interview over on their website!

EPIC THEMES (and…some other stuff over there)

Jonathan Hickman is a comic book writer who has mostly taken over the two main AVENGERS books, and has also published a number of highly acclaimed creator-owned books that took remarkably innovative approaches to graphic narratives. But as much as I’ve enjoyed most of his work (especially his Secret Warriors which is one of my favorite Marvel series in recent years), I’ve noticed something…off…about his story telling (Red Mass For Mars and The Red Wing in particular both start off really cool and then…don’t really go anywhere).

Over at Tor.com, I’ve provided a detailed analysis of this strange narrative voice, but what it comes down to is that Hickman likes to explicitly tell his readers about his huge, epic, sweeping themes using marvelous spectacle and narrative devices. Then he finds a plot that works as an excuse for him to tell you about these themes and use these spectacles, and fills the plot in with characters, ’cause I guess you need those, too. And the theatre professional in me realized that this flies right in the face of Aristotle’s POETICS, which have long formed the basis for our understanding of Western dramatic storytelling.

I’ll let the rest of the article speak for itself:

“The Strange Poetics of Jonathan Hickman” on Tor Dot Com