Tag Archives: theater

…Or Does It Explode?

Here’s a little teaser trailer I put together for our upcoming production of A Raisin In The Sun at the Huntington. I didn’t have much to work with in terms of resources or time, so I recorded one of our actors reciting the Langston Hughes poem on which the title is based, and added some shots of Chicago in the ’50s. Still, I’m pretty pleased with the results.

The Multiverse On Stage

Over at Tor.com, I talk about Nick Payne’s Constellations, a play which I unfortunately have not seen, but one that I have read and would absolutely love to see. Except that maybe in the world of this simultaneous-multiverse-hopping-romance, I have actually seen the play somewhere. Plus every other parallel reality happening possible. It’s kind of nuts, and kind of beautiful, but I describe it better over there, so check it out:

“SFF Onstage: Nick Payne’s Constellations” on Tor Dot Com

“…And We Go Ahhhhhhh / Like a Raisin in The Sun /…. “

(…that’s how the song goes, right?)

Coming up next at the Huntington, Liesl Tommy is returning to direct the classic A Raisin In The Sun, a play which I probably don’t need to tell you anything about because you’ve already read it. But here’s a video I made of our Artistic Director Peter DuBois talking about what makes this production special (including a mention of Bevin’s next project, the Boston premiere of last year’s Tony Award winner Clybourne Park for SpeakEasy Stage).

A Raisin In The Sun plays March 8 – April 7, 2013 at the Avenue of the Arts / BU Theatre, and Clybourne Park runs March 1 – 30, 2013 at the South End / Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA.

Who For You For Me For Who?

My incredibly talented partner, Ms. M. Bevin O’Gara, is directing the Boston premiere of You For Me For You, a fantastical new play by Mia Chung that tells the story of two sisters trying to escape North Korea and flee to the United States. Bevin and I tend to stay out of each others’ ways when it comes to our creative processes, so while I’ve read the script, I honestly don’t know much about the production itself — but I can tell you that I’m incredibly excited to see this highly imaginative story acted out on stage (and not just because my girlfriend is the director and I’m biased).

Here’s a little preview video I put together for the production, which starts performances tomorrow and runs through February 16:

(side note, when I was approached to create a video for the show, it took so much of my will power to not just give them this:

but you knew that was coming, right? I’m a horrible person)

“I Speak For You”

I’ve posted a bunch about Invisible Man already, but don’t take my word for it. Here’s an audience testimonial video that I put together, so you can hear what the actual audience has to say about it. Plus, there’s some video footage from the production, which looks pretty damn cool if you do ask me!

Live Theatre On Video, Live!

For those of you who missed the 2nd Annual Boston One-Minute Play Festival, you’re in the luck! The whole thing is streaming online here at HowlRound’s NewPlayTV.

If you don’t want to watch the entire thing (which is understandable, it’s 2 hours long), my 2 plays are at approximately 28 minutes, and at 48:55.

Also, you might want to fastforward to the end to watch a delightful surprise.

The Race One, Not The Sci-Fi One

Previews start tomorrow at the Huntington for our stage adaptation of Ralph Ellison’s seminal novel Invisible Man. If nothing else, this is simply one of the most stunning visual feats for storytelling I’ve seen. Here’s a little video I put together about the play from interviews I did with the creators and the lead actor playing Invisible Man. Check it out:

Invisible Man plays Jan. 4 — Feb. 3 at the Avenue of the Arts / BU Theatre.

Wow. Our Town. Wow. Okay.

I say this with no personal bias — not because my wonderful girlfriend, the producer of this fine production, has been busting her ass for 10 months to make this show as a reality, and not as an employee of the theatre company that is presenting the show.

David Cromer’s production of Our Town at the Huntington is one of the Desert Island All-Time Top 5 Most Moving Shared Communal Experiences I have ever had in my entire life.

Perhaps it’s especially poignant for me when I think of the friends that I’ve lost in recent years, but I watched the show on both Tuesday and Wednesday night, and I couldn’t stand to watch it for a third time last night for our opening because I was already so overwhelmed with emotion. Three days in a row, and I think I would be eternally reduced to a sobbing puddle of flesh lying in fetal position on the floor. Yes, this show is so good that I literally could not watch it a third time (although I will probably go back at the end of the run, and hopefully catch some things I missed the other 2 times, because there’s so much to see in the nothingness of this production, and as the play itself suggests, we can’t possibly appreciate all of it when it’s happening).

Anyway, there’s a video I made up there about the show. I cannot stress enough how powerful and poignant this production truly is. Our Town might be seen as hokey and sentimental and high school-y to many people (though oddly I grew up in Thornton Wilder’s hometown and never read or saw the show once, although I did play lots of shitty punk rock shows at Thornton Wilder Memorial Hall), but man, David Cromer just gets it, in a way that’ll just blow your mind.

(Also don’t read the review in The Boston Globe because [a] it’s douchey, [b] IT SPOILS THE END OF THE PLAY, and [c] it’s douchey. Yes, Our Town has been around a while, so there are certain spoilers that are now beyond the statute of limitations, but to spoil what makes this production so remarkable — and to spoil it in such a nonchalant manner — is awful. If this guy had reviewed The Sixth Sense when it first came out, he would have said “And then it turns out that Bruce Willis was dead the whole time which was totally brilliant and stunning — I mean, that is to say, if you’re one of those people who enjoys brilliant and stunning things or whatever. But otherwise, meh.”)

Welcome to the C-Wood

The Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center for the Arts has a very special place in my heart. I was hired there to work as an usher in my first few weeks of college, and it ended up serving as my main place of employment throughout those 4 years. By my Junior year, I had moved up to Assistant House Manager, and started doing some administrative work as well — which helped leverage me into my current position at the Huntington, as we manage that building as well. (plus my first apartment was right next to it, which was a convenient commute for work, but, well, the story of that apartment is a whole other thing) It’s a beautiful modern theatre space with 4 performance spaces as well as rehearsal rooms and more, and it serves a lot of great smaller theatre companies, in addition to our own shows.

Here’s a video I put together as part of our fundraising campaign at the Huntington, showing the impact that the building has had the community.