Tag Archives: time travel

Quantum Fiction!

Here’s a little excerpt from a story I’ve been working on in a few different mediums (I’ve shared a few other snippets, too, if you’d like to piece them together and figure it out…). It’s science-y and physics-y and all timey-wimey, but hopefully it’s at least a little bit enjoyable on its own!

“Quantum Physiology, or The Origins of Nonlinear Molecular Teleportation” on FiveByFiveHundred.com

Memory, Time, and Infidelity

Here’s a little behind-the-scenes documentary that I put together for our upcoming production of Harold Pinter’s Betrayal at the Huntington. This was one of the first plays to famously explore a nonlinear chronology, which is one of its more interesting qualities (basically, LOST owes a lot to Betrayal). Anyway, check it out. Previews start Friday!

Nonlinear Romance

Today over at Five By Five Hundred, I’ve included a brief excerpt from a short story & play I’m working on about love and time travel, and an endlessly cyclical relationship where both parties start at different times. (and then of course as I type that I think “ah shit, now everyone’s gonna think I’m ripping off of River Song and The Doctor, or I’m trying to re-write The Time Traveler’s Wife. Oh well). There  might be more from the story next week; or, I might do something entirely different. Who knows! (answer: you do, if you’re a time traveler)

“When We First Met (excerpt)” at FiveByFiveHundred.com

Haiku Beer Review: The Third!

Continuing in my established tradition from the Mass Brewer’s Fest and last year’s Winter Beer Jubilee, I present for you the latest installment of Haiku Beer Review, compiled at the 2012 Winter Beer Summit. I make tasting notes into my phone as the night goes on, so that I can turn them into haikus when I get home (and eventually sober up). I know, I know, I’m a genius, it’s true. Anyway, enjoy!

(Also, thanks to Dig Boston for the free tickets and for putting up with my whining. #thomdunnwantsbeer)

“Haiku Beer Review #3: Winter Beer Summit 2012” on FiveByFiveHundred.com

Let’s Kill Hitler M. Night Shyamalan!

It’s a classic time travel question: if you had the ability to change history and travel through time, would you go back and kill Baby Hitler to prevent the Holocaust from ever happening? But then, what has innocent little baby Hitler ever done — could you possibly raise him in a way to stop him from ever becoming the monster that he does, without killing him? It’s a great thought problem, but I propose a better idea:

Going back in time to kill M. Night Shyamalan, around the time that Signs was released. Because if you think about it, you’d actually be doing everyone a favor — including M. Night himself. He would be the victim of a mysterious murder, and remembered as a young auteur filmmaker who died before his time. He’d be remembered for such greats as Signs and Unbreakable, and the rest of us would never have to suffer through such insipid crap as Lady in the Water or The Happening.

This week on Five By Five Hundred, I explore this exact scenario.

“I Kill Dead People” on FiveByFiveHundred.com

How To Live Safely In A Science Fictional Universe

Read this book. I am not even kidding.

The latest novel from Charles Yu, How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe is a brilliantly tongue-in-cheek examination of memories and father-son relationships, through the veil of cheeky sci-fi and wacky time travel concepts. Charles Yu (the character, not the author) is a time travel mechanic with a Masters Degree in Applied Science Fiction. While on a quest to reconnect with his estranged father, Charles Yu (the character) accidentally shoots Future Charles Yu (the future character) in the stomach, but not before Future Charles Yu hands him a copy of a book called How to Live Safely In a Science Fictional Universe, which was/is/will be written by Charles Yu (the character. And the author? I don’t know).

Charles Yu (the character) also has a dog named Ed that was retroactively erased from continuity and so technically doesn’t exist due to a paradoxical causality but, like any good dog, still loves his owner regardless of his own lack of logical existence.

You can read my full review of How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe over at DailyGenoshan.com, but what really matters is that it’s one of the best books I’ve read in the last year, so you should probably pick it up.